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National faith community bodies

The Inter Faith Network for the UK works with its member bodies to achieve its aims. These include national faith community representative bodies, whose inter faith engagement plays a vital role in building good relations between people of different faiths and beliefs.

Between February and April 2017, IFN published a series of Facebook 'mini-profiles' outlining the inter faith engagement of its member bodies in the national faith community representative body category. These are reproduced below. Contact information for IFN's member national faith community representative bodies can be found on the 'Member List' page.

*Information provided by national faith community representative bodies correct as of 31 March 2017. Images provided by member body unless otherwise stated. 

  • Bahá’í Community of the UK

    The national body of the Baha’i community is the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahai’s of the United Kingdom (NSA).

    Together with ‘local Spiritual Assemblies’, the NSA guides the affairs of the Baha’i community in the UK. The NSA, with its Office of Public Affairs, also represents Baha’is in the public context. It has a number of programmes including education and community building programmes and inter faith engagement.

    The Baha’i community is actively involved in inter faith work, and was a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK. It participates in national Inter Faith Week, IFN’s Faith Communities Forum and in many other initiatives.

    Below is a photo from a Baha’i Inter Faith Week event, ‘Conversations and Beyond’.

  • BAPS Swaminarayan Sanstha

    BAPS Swaminarayan Sanstha (BAPS) began in the UK in the 1950s.

    The organisation is based at BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir in Neasden, London – often referred to as the Neasden Temple. Alongside representing its members, which include BAPS mandirs and centres across the UK, it educates about Hinduism and engages in various community outreach activities.

    Rooted in the teachings of Bhagwan Swaminarayan, who lived in India in the 18th and 19th centuries, BAPS plays an active role in multi-faith social action projects, such as Sewa Day, and local initiatives, such as Mitzvah Day. It was a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows volunteers of BAPS Charities, the community outreach arm of BAPS, collecting clothes for the homeless as part of a multi-faith social action project.

  • Board of Deputies of British Jews

    The Board of Deputies of British Jews is a cross-community body which was established in 1760.

    It links the various sections of the Jewish community, tackles prejudice, educates the public about Judaism, and represents the interests of the Jewish community in public life and wider society. It also represents the UK Jewish community on international bodies such as the European Jewish Congress. 

    The Board has a long history of inter faith work, and represents the Jewish community on a number of initiatives that further good relations between people of different faiths and beliefs in the UK. This includes wider work to tackle prejudice and extremism. It is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows the Board of Deputies’ Interfaith and Social Action Officer Anthony Silkoff cooking at the SUFRA Food Bank as part of Mitzvah Day and Inter Faith Week.

  • British Muslim Forum

    The British Muslim Forum is a national umbrella body of Mosques, Muslim institutions and community organisations in the UK belonging to the Sunni tradition.

    It seeks to promote coordination, engagement, consultation and cooperation regarding matters affecting British Muslims in wider society.

    BMF also works to increase cooperation between the Muslim community and others. Its inter faith activity has included organising inter faith ‘iftaars’ where members of other faiths share in the breaking of the fast during Ramadan and producing material to encourage youth engagement in inter faith contexts. It joined the Inter Faith Network for the UK in 2006, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Below is a photo of an inter faith iftar with the Bishop of Bradford at the Bradford Grand Mosque.

  • Buddhist Society

    The Buddhist Society was founded in 1924 to publish and make known the principles of Buddhism and to encourage the study and practice of those principles.

    It provides a range of classes and courses in the Buddha’s teachings and major Buddhist traditions, as well as instruction in Buddhist meditation and daily life practice. Free lunchtime meditation classes are held every weekday, as well as an Introduction to Meditation class on Saturday afternoons. The Buddhist Society’s premises in London contain shrine rooms and an extensive library.  

    The Buddhist Society hosts and encourages dialogues which deepen understanding between Buddhism and other religions and beliefs. The Society also encourages school visits. The journal of the Buddhist Society, The Middle Way, regularly contains articles and resources on inter faith themes. The Buddhist Society is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photograph below shows a meeting of the World Congress of Faiths at the Buddhist Society.

  • Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales

    The Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales (CBCEW) is the permanent assembly of Catholic Bishops and Personal Ordinaries in the two member nations.

    It provides news, resources, education and information about the Catholic Church, and represents Roman Catholics in public life and wider society. It also represents the Catholic Church in England and Wales in ecumenical contexts.

    ‘The Department for Dialogue and Unity works to foster cooperation with other Christian traditions and other faiths. It also implements Catholic Church teaching to promote an understanding of the living faith of Judaism and the Jewish roots of Christianity. The department has two committees: The Core Group for Christian Unity and the Committee for Catholic/Jewish Relations. It also has an Office for Relations with Other Religions.’ It is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK (originally through its relevant Committee), and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran with Archbishop Kevin McDonald and representatives of different religions at the “Together in Prayer for Peace” event, 2013.

  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (CJCLDS) has been present in the UK since 1837.

    The UK CJCLDS community has two Temples, one in the south of England located near East Grinstead, Sussex and one in the north of England in Chorley, Lancashire. These are spiritual centres for CJCLDS members throughout the UK and link with congregations across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The Church in the UK is part of the Europe area and represents LDS communities in public life and ecumenical work. 

    CJCLDS is engaged with inter faith work in the UK, and takes part alongside members of other faiths in inter faith events and multi faith social action projects. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2014, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Below is a photo of the CJCLDS’ Keith Bishop in dialogue at an IFN National Meeting (Photo: IFN).

  • Churches Together in Britain and Ireland

    Churches Together in Britain and Ireland (CTBI) was formed in 1990, following the Swanwick Declaration, to link Churches in the four nations of the UK.

    CTBI links in membership National Ecumenical Instruments, churches, bodies in association and agencies. It has four broad strands of work: ‘Witnessing Together’, ‘Spirituality and Reflection’, ‘Mission and Unity’ and ‘Theology’.

    The Churches’ Forum for Inter-Religious Relations is the place where CTBI member churches meet together to discuss inter faith matters, sometimes with an invited guest from another faith. It works with bodies like the World Council of Churches on issues such as the impact of migration on inter faith relations. The Forum also engages with issues such as the relationship between evangelisation and inter faith dialogue. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2007, with the Committee of its forerunner, the British Council of Churches, a founder member.

    Major Alan Dixon representing CTBI at a meeting of IFN's Faith Communities Forum in 2016 (Photo: IFN). 

  • Churches Together in England

    Churches Together in England (CTE) was founded in 1990 following the 1987 Swanwick Declaration.

    It is one of four national Churches Together 'instruments' in the UK which enable Churches in Britain and Ireland to relate to each other in shared exploration of faith and belief and for mutual support and encouragement. County/Intermediate ecumenical bodies support, resource and encourage congregations, local ‘Churches Together’ groups and Ecumenical Partnerships.

    CTE’s e-News shares inter faith information and many of its Ecumenical Officers play a part in local inter faith engagement. It contributes to the Inter Faith Theological Advisory Group of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland. CTE has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2007, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The image below shows Bishop Joe Aldred, who currently represents CTE in a number of inter faith contexts, at an IFN event (Photo: IFN). 

  • Council of African and Afro-Caribbean Churches (UK)

    The Council of African and Caribbean Churches UK was formed in 1979 as a representative body linking African and Caribbean diaspora congregations in the UK.

    The Council links African and Caribbean Churches in membership, assists in the training of ministers, and represents African and Caribbean Christian communities in public life and wider society. The Council also represents its members on Christian ecumenical bodies, such as Churches Together in England and Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.

    The Council is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK and represents African and Caribbean Christian communities on inter faith issues in a number of contexts, including IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Below is a photo of CACCUK founder Father Olu Abiola OBE at an IFN event (Photo: IFN). 

  • Druid Network

    The Druid Network was founded in 2003 to connect individuals and groups , through coordinating efforts and initiatives, and to inform, inspire and facilitate Druidry as a religion.

    It connects with local Groves, and represents its members on public bodies, in the media and in wider society and also works to educate the wider public about Druidry.

    As part of its work, the Druid Network promotes understanding between faiths. Members at a national and local level play an active role in inter faith activity. The Druid Network has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2014, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The image below is of Naomi Jacobs from the Druid Network at the meeting of the Faith Communities Forum with Educational and Academic Bodies (Photo: IFN). 

  • General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches

    The General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches was founded in 1928.

    It is the representative body for British Unitarian and Free Christian Churches all of whom are committed to the principle of upholding ‘the religious liberty of their members, unconstrained by the imposition of creeds’. It includes in membership congregations; regional associations; societies and affiliated bodies, some of which are overseas, and ministers. The organisation promotes the aims and values of its members in public life, shares resources and good practice, and represents members in ecumenical and interfaith contexts. 

    The General Assembly promotes opportunities for different religions to share their traditions with one another, engages in dialogue with people of other faith traditions, and is active in local, national and international interfaith organisations. Unitarians helped establish the International Association for Religious Freedom in 1900; one of the first inter-religious organisations. It is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows Derek McAuley, CEO of the General Assembly in discussion at a Baha’i event on religious freedom in 2016. 

  • Hindu Council (UK)

    Hindu Council UK (HCUK) was launched in 1994.

    Its aim is to represent all Hindu religious cultural and social organisations and speak for them as one voice. Since its inception it has contributed to discussions on education, health, housing, human rights and influenced policies in these areas at local and national level.

    HCUK states that it “represents and promotes basic Hindu Dharma tenets of 'Vasudeva kutumbkam' and 'sarva dhrarma samman' meaning 'the whole world is my family and respect for all religions respectively.” It has been involved in inter faith related activities throughout its history. It.became a member body of Inter Faith Network for the UK in 1997, whose aims and objectives it shares.

    Inter faith procession during Janamashtmi celebrations at Shree Ram Mandir Southall August 2016. Co-Chairpersons Umesh Chander Sharma and Satya Minhas with Directors Davinder (Gulu) Anand and Arun Thakur. 

  • Hindu Forum of Britain

    The Hindu Forum of Britain (HFB) is an umbrella body for Hindu organisations in the UK, established in 2004.

    It represents and links Hindu communities, organisations and temples. The HFB represents British Hindus in public life including in matters pertaining to central government and to the media. It develops projects within the Hindu community, and more generally works to promote the interests of British Hindus in wider society and community cohesion and social inclusion.

    HFB engages in bilateral and multilateral dialogues with other faith communities, as well as participating in multi faith social action projects. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2005, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Below is a picture of Hindu Forum of Britain President Ms. Trupti Patel at IFN’s National Meeting 2016 (Photo: IFN).

  • Inter Faith Working Group of the Baptist Union of Great Britain

    The Baptist Union of Great Britain (BUGB) is made up of churches, regional associations, specialist teams and Baptist colleges throughout England and Wales and works with others in mission locally, regionally and internationally.

    The BUGB describes itself as ‘diverse with small and large congregations, different nationalities and differing styles of worship yet united by core values and a common purpose of changing lives and transforming communities with the message and love of Jesus Christ.’

    The Inter Faith Working Group of the BUGB encourages Baptist churches to: encounter people of other faiths with respect; develop positive relationships with people of other faiths; encourage authentic dialogue; and encourage real engagement and journeying together. The Working Group has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2016 and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    'People from a mosque and from churches worked together on Mosque Open Day to make this paper chain'. 

  • Islamic Cultural Centre

    The Islamic Cultural Centre (ICC) was established in 1944.

    It is a Muslim cultural organisation based at the London Central Mosque, Regent’s Park. Its work ranges from religious instruction for its members to community engagement and public education and media.

    The ICC has an ‘Interfaith Department’ which holds events, hosts visits, and engages with public agencies on inter faith issues. An example of its work is a project called ’Not in Our Faith’ where it partners with all faith groups to denounce terror and hate crime committed in the name of religion. ICC is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below is from the launch of ‘We Stand Together’ at the London Central Mosque, a campaign of solidarity between people of different faiths launched in 2016.

  • Jain Network

    The Jain Network UK was launched in 2007 to provide facilities and resources to the Jain community in the UK, as well as to link Jain organisations.

    Its mission is the ‘improvement of spiritual and physical quality of life of the Jain and wider community’. It is currently developing a Jain Centre based on traditional designs in Colindale, London, which aims to become a global hub to promote Jain values and a place of information on Jainism. The centre will have places of worship and study for all major Jain traditions and a community and multi faith centre.

    The Jain Network is involved in inter faith activity and aims to “advance knowledge and mutual understanding” of different faiths. The Network has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2012, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The picture below is Dr Natubhai Shah MBE who representing the Jain Network on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum in 2016 (Photo: IFN).

  • Jain Samaj Europe

    The Jain Samaj Europe was founded in 1980 and is based at the Jain Centre in Leicester.

    The Jain Samaj Europe functions as a linking body for Jain individuals and communities across Europe, in addition to educating the public, and representing Jains in Europe in the media and in public life. Its work has a UK component.

    Jain Samaj Europe engages with inter faith issues, and organises inter faith events, including through offering members of the public tours of the Jain Centre in order to increase understanding and cooperation. It is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Dr Natubhai Shah, representing the Jain Samaj Europe at IFN’s National Meeting 2015 (Photo: IFN).

     

  • Jamiat-E-Ulama Britain (Association of Muslim Scholars)

    Jamiat-e-Ulama Britain is an association for Muslim scholars in Britain of the Deobandi tradition of Sunni Islam.

    Amongst its aims is to strengthen the Muslim community by protecting Islamic beliefs, heritage and places of worship as well as furthering Arabic and Islamic studies across the UK. It has branches across the UK.

    Jamiat-e-Ulama’s aims also include “fostering and stabilising amicable relations between different communities living in the United Kingdom, in accordance with the teachings of Islam”. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 1996, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Ayub Laher from Jamiet-e-Ulama representative on the Faith Communities Forum in conversation at an IFN event (Photo: IFN).

     

  • Methodist Church in Britain

    The Methodist Church in Britain owes its origins to the reforming work of John Wesley and others in England in the mid-eighteenth century.

    It is organised in districts, circuits and local churches, and is involved in a variety of social and educational activities. Policy is decided by the Annual Conference.

    The Methodist Church in Britain has an Inter Faith Relations Reference Group with the United Reformed Church. This assists it in resourcing its members to engage with inter faith issues and playing an active role at national and local levels. The Methodist Church in Britain has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2012, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows David Musgrave of the Methodist Church in Britain in dialogue with other participants at an IFN Faith Communities’ Forum meeting (Photo: IFN).

  • Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board

    The Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board (MINAB) was founded in 2006 to promote best practice in British mosques.

    It works with and represents all Muslim traditions and schools of thought. It aspires to build capacity in mosques, help deliver standards and ensure mosque personnel have a better understanding of British Muslim needs.

    MINAB provides scholarly and professional training on inter faith issues to religious and community leaders, and provides resources on religious tolerance and co-existence.  It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2009, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below is from a MINAB Inter Faith Week event on the role of faith institutions in tackling domestic violence.

  • Muslim Council of Britain

    The Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) was established in 1997.

    It is a national umbrella body representing the Muslim community in the UK. Its membership includes national, regional and local organisations, mosques, charities and schools. It represents the interests of the Muslim community in wider society; aims to promote cooperation, consensus and unity on Muslim affairs in the UK; and works to foster improved community relations.

    MCB’s inter faith engagement includes facilitating Visit My Mosque Day, where Muslims invite neighbours of all faiths and none to visit their places of worship. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2001, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below is from an event held as part of Visit My Mosque Day 2017.

  • National Council of Hindu Temples (NCHT)

    The National Council of Hindu Temples (NCHT) was founded in 1978.

    It links in membership Hindu temples, faith organisations, and groups across the UK. NCHT supports and assists with capacity building in the Hindu community; assists with the employment of priests; and provides information and advice to government departments, local authorities and other public agencies. It also arranges visits to temples for educational institutions and runs a chaplaincy programme.

    NCHT’s inter faith work seeks to engage with other faith groups for mutual appreciation of each other’s traditions, to further inter faith dialogue and foster community cohesion. It is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows General Secretary Pandit Satish K Sharma at an IFN FCF meeting, November 2015 (Photo: IFN). 

  • Network of Buddhist Organisations (UK)

    The Network of Buddhist Organisations (UK) was founded in 1993 to promote fellowship and dialogue between Buddhists in the UK; facilitate cooperation in matters of common interest; and work in harmony with Buddhist and like-minded organisations.

    It links a range of Buddhist organisations in the UK and acts as a forum for discussion and a source of common action.

    NBO is involved in the areas of Interfaith, Religious Education, Healthcare Chaplaincy and Buddhist Action Month, which celebrates Buddhists' involvement in socially beneficial action. It is a member of the European Buddhist Union.

    NBO is active in promoting good inter faith relations and encourages engagement of its member bodies. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 1996, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows the NBO’s Interfaith Officer, Acharya Modgala Duguid, in dialogue at IFN’s National Meeting (Photo: IFN).

  • Network of Sikh Organisations (UK)

    The Network of Sikh Organisations (NSO) is a linking of more than 130 gurdwaras and other Sikh bodies in developing common approaches to spiritual and secular life.

    It works with government and other bodies to ensure that the views and concerns of UK Sikhs are fully represented in different walks of life. NSO programmes include provision of chaplaincy services for prisons and hospitals, health care and the teaching and inspection of Sikhism in schools, and in supporting SACREs. It also assists young Sikhs to understand the richness of their heritage, and actively promote interfaith dialogue and an understanding of the Sikh way of life in the wider community.

    The NSO, initially called the Sikh Committee for Interfaith Relations, was a founder member of IFN. An example of recent work is the encouragement of young Sikhs to learn about other religions and share that within their congregations. It is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photograph below is of Lord Singh of Wimbledon at the Southwark i-Witness event during Inter Faith Week, 2014.

  • Pagan Federation

    The Pagan Federation was founded in 1971.

    It works to promote a positive profile for Pagans and Paganism; to provide information on Pagan beliefs to the media, official bodies and the wider public; and to support all Pagans to ensure they have the same rights as the followers of other beliefs and religions. It produces a journal called Pagan Dawn.

    Inter faith engagement is a significant strand of the Federation’s work, it promotes inter faith events as well as sharing resources among its members on inter faith issues. It has been a member body of the Inter Faith Network since 2014, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows Pagan Federation Vice President Mike Stygal (centre) at IFN’s FCF meeting in November 2016 (Photo: IFN). 

     

  • Quaker Committee for Christian and Interfaith Relations

    The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers in Britain) has been in existence since the mid-seventeenth century.

    It is the organisation that links Quakers across Britain. Quakers in Britain represents Quaker Meetings in public life and campaigns on a range of social issues, particularly peace, alongside running social action projects. Members are known as Quakers or Friends.

    The Quaker Committee for Christian and Interfaith Relations (QCCIR) advises Friends on inter faith and inter church engagement, produces resources and engages with a range of other ecumenical and inter faith organisations. It helps Friends “enter imaginatively into the life and witness of other faith groups to create bonds of friendship and mutual understanding.” It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 1999, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Bessie White the QCCIFR representative on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum in dialogue at an IFN event in Luton (Photo: IFN).

  • Spiritualists' National Union

    The Spiritualists’ National Union (SNU) was founded in 1901.

    It links and supports Spiritualist churches, centres and individuals across the UK. It runs an educational programme which explores the philosophy, religion and practice of Spiritualism and provides accredited training for ministers and members, as well providing resources and educating the public about Spiritualism.

    SNU is involved in inter faith engagement at national and local level. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2014, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Minister David Hopkins of SNU speaking at the IFN Board Meeting in December 2016 (Photo: IFN). 

  • Sri Lankan Sangha Sabha of GB

    The Sri Lankan Sangha Sabha of the United Kingdom (SLSSUK), founded in 1991, is the representative body of Sri Lankan Buddhist monks and temples in the UK.

    SLSSUK represents temples in England and Scotland and is based at the London Buddhist Vihara in West London. As well as linking temples in membership, the SLSSUK also educates the public about Theravada Buddhism, and provides resources.

    SLSSUK holds inter faith events at its centres across the UK, especially during Inter Faith Week and Om Day. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 1997, having succeeded its predecessor, the Maha Bodhi Society, which was a founder member. It is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows the Honourable President of the SLSSUK, the Most Venerable Bogoda Seelawimala, in dialogue at IFN’s 2016 National Meeting (Photo: IFN).

  • United Reformed Church in the UK

    The United Reformed Church in the UK (URC) was formed in 1972 when Presbyterians in England merged with Congregationalists in England and Wales.

    These Churches were later followed by the Churches of Christ and Scottish Congregationalists. The URC has congregations across the country and works closely with other Christian churches both locally and at national and international level.

    The United Reformed Church describes itself as committed to “relationships of integrity and respect with of neighbours of other faith”. With the Methodist Church in Britain, the URC has an Interfaith Reference Group, which supports staff members and serves as a source of expertise within and beyond the two Churches. The URC has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 2015, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows the Revd Maggie Hindley, a URC minister, with a group at the London Interfaith Centre, 2016. 

  • Vishwa Hindu Parishad (UK)

    Vishwa Hindu Parishad UK (VHP) is a Hindu organisation founded in 1972.

    It aims to support, maintain and protect the principles and practice of Hindu Dharma and culture in the UK. As part of this, it advises on the teaching of Hinduism in schools, supports SACREs, encourages unity among Hindus and represents the interests of British Hindus in public life. Its social action projects include the provision of cultural and religious support to those in need.

    VHP encourages participation in activities that promote racial harmony, and supports inter-faith dialogue. It engages with multi faith social action projects such as Sewa Day. It is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photo below shows Vinaya Sharma of VHP addressing a meeting of IFN’s Faith Communities Forum in November 2016 (Photo: IFN). 

  • World Ahlul-Bayt Islamic League

    The World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League (WABIL) works for the advancement of Islamic Shia religion and for the advancement of education and relief of poverty amongst its members.

    WABIL is a London based charity and seeks to give advice and support to Shia Muslims, including those in the UK. It also helps with the assignment of teachers and religious leaders to Shia communities, and assists Shi’a Muslims in a number of ways.

    As part of its inter faith work, WABIL comments on inter faith issues, advises its members on inter faith dialogue and conducts work through its individual mosques and centres. The World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    Ms Sabira Lakha (WABIL – right) with Bessie White (Quaker) in discussion at an IFN FCF meeting in 2016 (Photo: IFN).

     

     

  • World Islamic Mission (UK)

    The World Islamic Mission (WIM) is an international Muslim organisation of Sufi-inspired Barelvi Sunni Muslims.

    Its UK branch is World Islamic Mission UK (WIMUK).  WIMUK provides advocacy, advice and information on Islam to the Muslim community and the wider public. It organises public meetings to create awareness of spiritual and moral values and helps its community in educational activities by offering advice and information.

    WIMUK encourages inter-faith dialogue by participating in multi-faith events. It is a founder member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The photograph shows Maulana Raza of the World Islamic mission at an IFN member bodies meeting (Photo: IFN).

  • Zoroastrian Trust Funds of Europe

    The Zoroastrian Trust Funds of Europe (ZTFE) was founded in 1861.

    It is a religious, cultural and social organisation for Zoroastrians in the United Kingdom and Europe. As well as its work in support of the pastoral and practical needs of its own members, it contributes to government consultations, responds to requests for assistance on areas such as hospital chaplaincy and provides speakers for schools and educational resources about Zoroastrianism.

    ZTFE participates in inter faith activity at a national, regional and local level and holds regular inter faith events at its national centre in Harrow. It has been a member of the Inter Faith Network for the UK since 1993, and is represented on IFN’s Faith Communities Forum.

    The image below is of a recent Inter Faith Week event at the Zoroastrian Centre remembering the contribution of Indian soldiers during World War I (Photo: V Kumar Photography).